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11 Fun Sense of Sight Activities for Preschoolers

Need some fun, hands-on ideas for sense of sight activities you can do with preschoolers at home or in class?

During the early years, children need to explore all the senses: sight, touch, smell, sound, and taste, in addition to balance (vestibular) and body awareness (proprioception). 

Senses usually work in conjunction with each other, and the sense of sight is often central. 

How do you teach the sense of sight to preschoolers? The best way for young kids to learn about their senses is for them to take part in rich learning experiences through play. 

This type of play benefits sensory development in many areas, such as cognition, language, motor skills, creativity, and problem solving.

Sharing quality children’s literature with preschoolers also helps to introduce the topic of sight, impart information about this important sense, and spark circle-time discussions. 

Here are 11 ideas:

11 activities for kids to learn about the sense of sight pinterest image

1. Read & Discuss: Arlo Needs Glasses

Arlo Needs Glasses by Barney Saltzberg is an interactive picture book that introduces the practical topics of eye checkups and getting glasses to help with sight when needed. 

Children who wear glasses can tell about their related experiences. Other kids could name friends and family members who wear glasses.

2. Arts & Crafts: Design Glasses

After reading Arlo Needs Glasses, give kids an opportunity to design their own glasses, either for Arlo or for themselves! Here are several options for a sense of sight craft:

  • On a printed (or child-drawn) picture of Arlo or of themselves, kids use crayons and markers to add fancy eyeglasses of their own design.
  • Many child-sized eyeglass templates are available online. Print them on plain paper or cardboard for kids to add their own designs and then cut.

3. Read, Discuss & Experience: It Looked Like Spilt Milk

It Looked Like Spilt Milk by Charles G. Shaw is a repetitive picture book that addresses the concept of visual perception

Try reading the book outdoors on a partly cloudy day or moving outside after sharing. Kids can look for clouds in the sky that remind them of familiar objects.

mom and child reading a book outside

4. Art: Design a Class/Family Book

Great kids books such as It Looked Like Spilt Milk can often lead to art activities.

After sharing this book and possibly viewing clouds in the sky, challenge the children to design pages for a new book. 

They can cut or tear white printer or construction paper into shapes, then decide what real-life object they looks like. 

Get kids to glue the shape onto dark blue paper to resemble the model book. Then write in the words for your kids by following the pattern established in the book. 

Compile all the pages for a new class or family read-aloud!

5. Sing The Corner Grocery Store by Raffi

Share this fun song about things someone could think they see if they have forgotten their glasses! Listen to the tune on YouTube.

Here are the lyrics:

There was cheese, cheese, walkin’ on its knees
In the store, in the store
There was cheese, cheese, walkin’ on its knees
In the corner grocery store

My eyes are dim, I cannot see
I have not brought my specs with me
I have not brought my specs with me

There were plums, plums, twiddling their thumbs
In the store, in the store
There were plums, plums, twiddling their thumbs
In the corner grocery store

My eyes are dim, I cannot see
I have not brought my specs with me
I have not brought my specs with me

There was corn, corn, blowin’ on a horn
In the store, in the store
There was corn, corn, blowin’ on a horn
In the corner grocery store

There were beans, beans, trying on some jeans
In the store, in the store
There were beans, beans, trying on some jeans
In the corner grocery store

My eyes are dim, I cannot see
I have not brought my specs with me
I have not brought my specs with me

There was more, more, just inside the door
In the store, in the store
There was more, much more, just inside the door
In the corner grocery store

6. Play: Blindfold Games

Make blindfolds out of old T-shirt material so kids can each have their own. Taking part in various activities while blindfolded helps children focus on the importance of sight and their other senses in everyday life.

child guiding a blindfolded kid

Partner Block Building

One child is the guide while the blindfolded child is the builder. The guide gives step-by-step instructions on how to construct a particular type of building. 

The blindfolded child does their best to build as directed, relying merely on hearing and touch.

Pin the Eyes on the Owl

One child is blindfolded at a time and attempts to affix the large eyes on the poster board picture of an owl. 

For added group involvement, allow the other children to give oral directions to the blindfolded child, such as up, down, left, and right.

Find the Animals

In pairs, one child is an animal of their choosing and the other child is the animal caretaker, who is blindfolded. 

Indoors or outside, the “animal” makes noises fitting with their chosen creature, while the “caretaker” wearing the blindfold tries to locate them by relying on their sense of hearing.

children playing a blindfold game

7. Play: See Colours

Each child chooses a differently coloured token. With a time limit, they are then tasked with collecting as many objects of the same colour as possible for their buckets from around the room, home, or yard.

8. Exercise: Sunglass Stroll

Offer a wide selection of fun sunglasses for kids to wear on a neighbourhood walk. 

Challenge them to pay close attention to things they see during the walk to dictate a list later. These could include various buildings, animals, and things that grow.

9. Experiment: See Like a Pirate

Pirates are famously known to wear eye patches. Share the book The Pirate of Kindergarten by George Ella Lyon with your children. The little girl in the book experiences double vision and must wear an eye patch to see correctly. 

Since most kids have single vision, how does wearing an eye patch affect their sight? Ask kids to predict and then let them try it while attempting to find toy gold coins hidden around the room.

Discuss the experience in circle time. Did things look any different while wearing the patch?

10. Experiment: Sight Station

After explaining each item’s use, offer a selection of sight instruments for kids to experience how they affect their sight. 

Possibilities include magnifying glasses, binoculars, microscopes, and old eyeglasses.

child trying on old glasses

11. Experiment: Visual Memory

Build visual memory by showing children a selection of small objects on a tray and then covering them. Challenge kids to name as many of the objects as possible. 

Discuss: why were some objects easier for certain children to remember than others? 

Possibilities include colour/brightness, familiar/favourite object, or comparative size.

Enjoy trying these sense of sight ideas and activities! Here are more sensory station ideas to stimulate all the senses.


Would you like a year of done-for-you, ten-minute activities to teach your 3-5-year-old through play? Get your copy of the Learning Through Play Activity Pack for only $27.

Activity Pack for preschoolers

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